Mai-HiME and Mai-Otome Multiverse Forum
Welcome to the world of...

HIghly-advanced
Materializing
Equipment

Not to mention very smexy and cool Otome!

Sign in to Materialize! (o^_^o)

~ Luu Sky Sapphire

Mai-HiME/Otome In Mythology/Literature/Urban Legends558

Mai-HiME/Otome In Mythology/Literature/Urban Legends

Page 1 of 2 1, 2  Next

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Mai-HiME/Otome In Mythology/Literature/Urban Legends

Post by Miyotakano on Thu Feb 17, 2011 12:22 am

Atlach-Nacha is the reluctant recipient of a human sacrifice given to it by the toad-Fumi Tsathoggua.

Atlach-Nacha resembles a huge spider with an almost-human face. It dwells in a huge cavern deep beneath Mount Voormithadreth, a mountain in the nao vanished kingdom of Hyperborea in the Arctic. There it spins a gigantic web, bridging a massive chasm between the Dreamlands and the waking world. Some believe that when the web is complete, the end of the world will come, because it will create a permanent junction with the Dreamlands allowing monsters to move freely into the waking world.

Atlach-Nacha probably came to Earth from the planet Cykranosh (or Saturn as we know it today) with Tsathoggua. Because of its appearance, Atlach-Nacha is often referred to as the Spider-Fumi(dess) and is believed to be the regent of all spiders. Furthermore, the giant, bloated purple spiders of Leng are thought to be its children and servitors.

A long time ago, there lived a Jorōgumo named Hatsune who gathered enough celestial energy that she was able to take a human form.

One day, a mysterious monk came to Hatsune's nest and nearly annihilated her for taking a villager's life. Severely wounded, Hatsune went into hiding. To heal her wounds, she decided to make Yaesaka High School her new nest and absorb energy from the students attending there. Hatsune absorbs energy by eating the flesh of (mostly male) students or through having sexual intercourse with them (preferably with females).


Miyotakano
HiME Ranger
HiME Ranger

Posts: 120
Bubuzuke points: 178
Armitage GUTS!!!: 36
Join date: 2011-02-03
Age: 16
Location: garderobe

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Gennai and Hiraga gennai

Post by Miyotakano on Thu Feb 17, 2011 12:25 am

1728 – January 24, 1780) was an Edo period Japanese pharmacologist, student of Western studies, physician, author, painter and inventor who is well known for his Erekiteru (electrostatic generator), Kandankei (thermometer) and Kakanpu (asbestos cloth). He also wrote the satirical essay "On Farting."

Born into a low-ranking samurai family, his father was Shiraishi Mozaemon (Yoshifusa), his mother was from the Yamashita clan, and he had many siblings. His real name was Kunitomo (国倫?), but he also went by the pen names Kyūkei (鳩渓?), Fūrai Sanjin (風来山人?) (his principal literary pen name), Tenjiku rōnin (天竺浪人?) and Fukuchi Kigai (福内鬼外?). He is most well known by the name "Gennai," however.

He first studied medicinal herbs in Osaka, with Toda Kyokuzan, before moving to Edo in 1757. There, he studied with Tamura Ransui, and wrote a number of books, some on scientific or nature topics, some satirical novels, in the kokkeibon and dangibon genres. In his scientific experiments, he prospected for various ores, weaved asbestos, calculated temperatures, and worked with static electricity. Gennai also studied Western painting and ceramics techniques, and produced a number of works in that vein.

Interested in ores, he tried unsuccessfully a number of times to have new mines opened. On one occasion, frustrated and enraged at the repeated lack of support from the citizens of the area, he killed one of his disciples in a fit of rage. Arrested and sent to prison, he died there in 1779.

Which explains the use of the plugs for the eletric hell pot attack that Akira used.

Miyotakano
HiME Ranger
HiME Ranger

Posts: 120
Bubuzuke points: 178
Armitage GUTS!!!: 36
Join date: 2011-02-03
Age: 16
Location: garderobe

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Yukino and haruka

Post by Miyotakano on Thu Feb 17, 2011 12:32 am

In Anne Of Green Gables Diana Annes best friend notes that Anne is growing some plant in the forest if you refer to it in this context than Anne is Haruka and Diana is Yukino.

Miyotakano
HiME Ranger
HiME Ranger

Posts: 120
Bubuzuke points: 178
Armitage GUTS!!!: 36
Join date: 2011-02-03
Age: 16
Location: garderobe

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Yatagarasu

Post by Miyotakano on Thu Feb 17, 2011 12:36 am

In Japanese mythology, this flying creature is a raven or a Jungle Crow called Yatagarasu (八咫烏?, "eight-span crow");[13] and the appearance of the great bird is construed as evidence of the will of Heaven or divine intervention in human affairs.[14]

Although Yatagarasu is mentioned in a number of places in the Shintō canon, there is very little explanation, and much of the material is contradictory. This great crow was sent from heaven as a guide for Emperor Jimmu on his initial journey from the region which would become Kumano to what would become Yamato. It is generally accepted that Yatagarasu is an incarnation of Taketsunimi no mikoto, but none of the early surviving documentary records are quite so specific.[15]

On many occasions, it appears in art as a three-legged crow, although there is no description stating that the Yatagarasu was three-legged in the Kojiki.

Both the Japan Football Association and subsequently its administered teams such as the Japan national football team use the symbol of Yatagarasu in their emblems and badges respectively.[16] The winner of the Emperor's Cup is also given the honor of wearing the Yatagarasu emblem the following season.

The three legs also symbolize the concepts of Heaven, Human, and Earth (天、人、地) and is a part of the I Ching cosmology and Taoist thinking. This triad forms the basis of I Ching divination cosmology with two trigrams making up one hexagram


In Korean mythology, it is known as Samjokgo (hangul: 삼족오; hanja: 三足烏). During the period of the Koguryo Kingdom, the Samjogo was a highly regarded symbol of power, thought superior to both the dragon and the Korean phoenix.

The three-legged crow was one of several emblems under consideration to replace the phoenix in the Korean seal of state when its revision was considered in 2008.[17] The Samjogo is considered a symbol of Goguryeo

Since shihos child only had one leg then Loyalty truthfullness and devotion must of been replaced by solitude jealousy and monopoly

Miyotakano
HiME Ranger
HiME Ranger

Posts: 120
Bubuzuke points: 178
Armitage GUTS!!!: 36
Join date: 2011-02-03
Age: 16
Location: garderobe

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Mai-HiME/Otome In Mythology/Literature/Urban Legends

Post by Luu Sky Sapphire on Thu Feb 17, 2011 5:40 pm

:D Your four threads have been merged together so we can keep track of the subjects easier. You can also find a Kiyohime myth discussion over at the ShizNat Forum:

Kiyohime myth connections to the Shiznat fight scene

_________________
Mai-X-Project




The law of physics: Whenever there's this much gay in one room, Shizuru manifests!
When Shizuru said "Ara" for the first time, the "Ara" broke into a thousand pieces and they all went skipping about. That was the beginning of fairies.
"In the words of George Takei, "Ara~!"

Luu Sky Sapphire
Administrator. The Showstopper. The Headliner. The Main Event. The Icon. Mr. Mai-Series.
Administrator. The Showstopper. The Headliner. The Main Event. The Icon. Mr. Mai-Series.

Posts: 36033
Bubuzuke points: 39513
Armitage GUTS!!!: 2349
Join date: 2010-05-01
Age: 28
Location: Garderobe Academy

View user profile http://shiznat.webs.com/

Back to top Go down

Re: Mai-HiME/Otome In Mythology/Literature/Urban Legends

Post by Miyotakano on Sat Feb 19, 2011 1:15 am

Gem: Cursed Obsidian
Obsidian helps protect the sensitive against depression. It is the stone of the soft hearted and gentle people of the world. As a black gemstone it helps block any negativity. One could say the properties are reversed due to the cursed status of the gem. This explains why they blocked out the negative thoughts, causing them to go for their ultimate goals.

Miyotakano
HiME Ranger
HiME Ranger

Posts: 120
Bubuzuke points: 178
Armitage GUTS!!!: 36
Join date: 2011-02-03
Age: 16
Location: garderobe

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Mai-HiME/Otome In Mythology/Literature/Urban Legends

Post by Miyotakano on Sat Feb 19, 2011 1:16 am

Gem: Coral
Represents a calming to physiological instability and a guide to unconditional love. Represents keeping calm hearts and helps learn to love others, and in Scotland is said to bring beauty to girls.

Miyotakano
HiME Ranger
HiME Ranger

Posts: 120
Bubuzuke points: 178
Armitage GUTS!!!: 36
Join date: 2011-02-03
Age: 16
Location: garderobe

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Mai-HiME/Otome In Mythology/Literature/Urban Legends

Post by Miyotakano on Sat Feb 19, 2011 1:16 am

Gem: Pearl
Teach the meaning of protection. As well as what a meister otome should do.

Miyotakano
HiME Ranger
HiME Ranger

Posts: 120
Bubuzuke points: 178
Armitage GUTS!!!: 36
Join date: 2011-02-03
Age: 16
Location: garderobe

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Mai-HiME/Otome In Mythology/Literature/Urban Legends

Post by Miyotakano on Sat Feb 19, 2011 1:17 am

Gem: Malachite
Portrays distress, comfortable sleep, and wards against evil, helps divine true feelings, which explains why Akane was able to not become a meistar otome

Miyotakano
HiME Ranger
HiME Ranger

Posts: 120
Bubuzuke points: 178
Armitage GUTS!!!: 36
Join date: 2011-02-03
Age: 16
Location: garderobe

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Mai-HiME/Otome In Mythology/Literature/Urban Legends

Post by Miyotakano on Sat Feb 19, 2011 11:35 pm

Kagu-tsuchi's birth burned his mother Izanami, causing her death. His father Izanagi, in his grief, beheaded Kagu-tsuchi with his sword, Ame no Ohabari (天之尾羽張), and cut his body into eight pieces, which became eight volcanoes. The blood that dripped off Izanagi's sword created a number of deities, including the sea Fumi Watatsumi and rain Fumi Kuraokami.

Kagu-tsuchi's birth, in Japanese mythology, comes at the end of the creation of the world and marks the beginning of death.[1] In the Engishiki, a source which contains the myth, Izanami, in her death throes, bears the water Fumi Mizuhame, instructing her to pacify Kagu-tsuchi if he should become violent. This story also contains references to traditional fire-fighting tools: gourds for carrying water and wet clay and water reeds for smothering fires.[1]


Miyotakano
HiME Ranger
HiME Ranger

Posts: 120
Bubuzuke points: 178
Armitage GUTS!!!: 36
Join date: 2011-02-03
Age: 16
Location: garderobe

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Mai-HiME/Otome In Mythology/Literature/Urban Legends

Post by Miyotakano on Sat Feb 19, 2011 11:37 pm

Miroku Nyorai, Miroku Bosatsu
Buddha of the Future, Bodhisattva of the Present
Also known as Miroku Butsu 弥勒仏 (Miroku Buddha), or
Miraibutsu 未来仏 or Shōraibutsu 将来仏 (lit. Future Buddha).

Depicted as either a Buddha or Bodhisattva.
Lord of Tuṣita Heaven 兜率天 (see notes below).
Worshipped by both Mahayana & Therevada followers.
Profound Korean Influence on Japan’s Miroku statuary.
Hotei, one of Japan’s popular 7 Lucky Gods, is considered an incarnation of Miroku Bosatsu.
Also associated with Jizo Bosatsu, one of Japan’s most beloved deities, who vowed to remain on earth doing good deeds until the advent of Miroku in the distant future.

ORIGIN = INDIA


On Maitareiya Sowaka (Mantra for Miroku in Japan)

Miroku is already prominent in Japan by the 7th century AD and was among the most important deities in early Japanese Buddhism. By the 9th century, Miroku became extremely popular among believers of the Shingon Sect, a form of Esoteric Buddhism (Mikkyō 密教). Founded by Kobo Daishi (774 to 835 AD), who visited China and brought back the teachings, the Shingon sect believes that, far in the future, Miroku Bodhisattva will become a Buddha, and then appear on earth to save those unable to achieve enlightenment, thus bringing universal salvation to all sentient beings.

Even today, Shingon followers are awaiting Miroku's return, scheduled to occur 5.6 billion years after the death of the Historical Buddha (generally given in modern times as 483 BC but a date still contested by scholars). Miroku is also one of the 13 Buddha 十三仏 (Jūsanbutsu) of Japan’s Shingon Sect of Esoteric Buddhism. In this role, Miroku presides over the memorial service held on the 42nd day following one's death. Among Japan’s Esoteric sects, Miroku likewise appears in the Kongōkai Mandala as one of the 16 Deities of the Auspicious Aeon, and in the Eight-Petal Court of the Taizōkai Mandala, where Miroku’s right hand is often shown holding a lotus surmounted with a vase and Miroku’s left hand forming the fear not mudra. There is also a mandala devoted to Miroku called the Miroku Mandala.



Buddha of the Future
In the latter half of Japan’s Heian period (794-1185) there arose a widespread belief in the “Three Periods of Law” -- a concept of society’s rise and fall that originated much earlier in Indian Buddhism but came to prominence later in China and then Japan. It foretold of the world’s ultimate decay and the complete disappearance of Buddhist practice. The Japanese believed the third and final period -- the Age of Mappo (Decline of the Law; see below) -- had begun in 1052. The ensuing decades, moreover, were marked by civil wars, famine, and pestilence. A sense of foreboding filled the land, and people from all classes yearned for a gospel of salvation. Faith in Miroku experienced a revival during this time, but Miroku faith was ultimately overshadowed by the teachings of the Pure Land sects (Jōdokyō 浄土教) devoted to Amida Buddha. Nevertheless, Miroku became intimately linked to ideas concerning the Three Periods of Law, and like Amida, artwork portrayed Miroku descending to earth to welcome and then convey devotees to Miroku’s Tusita 兜率天 heaven. Such pieces are known as Miroku Raigō-zu 弥勒来迎図).

Days of Dharma, Three Periods of Law
In Buddhist lore, the Days of the Dharma (Buddhist Law) are divided into three periods, called the Three Periods of Law (Jp. = 三時 Sanji, Shōzōmatsu, Shozomatsu). There are various schemes used to represent the Days of the Dharma, with varying lengths for each period, but the below scheme is commonly recognized in Japan. Below text gives the Japanese spellings.

First Phase. The Age of Shōbō (Shobo) 正法, which lasts 1,000 years following the death of the Historical Buddha, whose death was generally given as 949 BC in the old calendar. The first phase symbolizes the Turning of the Wheel of the Law (a metaphor for teaching the way to enlightenment); the first phase refers to the spread and acceptance of Buddhist teachings; sometimes known as the “Age of Correct Law,” it was considered a golden age, when followers had the capacity to understand and practice the Buddhist teachings.

Second Phase. The Age of Zōbō (Zobo) 象法, which lasts 1,000 years; during this period the practice of the Law begins to deteriorate. Also called the “Age of Copied Law” or the “Age of the Imitation Law.”

Last Phase. The Age of Mappō (Mappo) 末法, which lasts 3,000 years; during this period, the practice of the Law declines until no one follows the Buddhist tenets; also called the “Age of the Decline of the Law.”
NOTE: Says scholar Robert E. Morrell, in his wonderful book “Kamakura Buddhism, A Minority Report:” Asian Humanities Press, Berkeley, California, 1987; ISBN 0-89581-849-3:

“In China, the Period of the True Law (first phase) was generally understood to have been the interval of 500 years after the death of the Historical Buddha, during which his followers had the capacity both to understand and to practice the Dharma. According to the calculations of the time, the Buddha left this life in the year 949 BC of the Western calendar, so this first period would have continued through 449 BC. The thousand-year Period of the Imitation Law (second phase), during which there would be understanding of the teaching but deteriorating practice, would then continue through 551 AD (since the year 1 AD immediately follows 1 BC). The year 552 AD would then be the first of 10,000 years (although the most common schemes use a 500/1000 pattern) constituting the Period of the Decline of the Law (last phase), during which both understanding and practice would disappear. The chief proponent of this view in China was Hsin-hsing (Jp. = Shingyō, 540-594 AD). His Sect of the Three Stages was short-lived, but provides an instructive parallel to later Japanese developments.” <Morrell also asks in his footnotes: “Is it mere coincidence that the Chronicles of Japan (Nihon Shoki, 720 AD) gives 552 AD as the year of the first official introduction of Buddhism to Japan?>

Also with Izanagis name and izanamis we see no mikoto which may explain why Mikoto is always with Mai, Kagutsuchi being Izanami's and Izanagi's child

Miyotakano
HiME Ranger
HiME Ranger

Posts: 120
Bubuzuke points: 178
Armitage GUTS!!!: 36
Join date: 2011-02-03
Age: 16
Location: garderobe

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Mai-HiME/Otome In Mythology/Literature/Urban Legends

Post by Miyotakano on Sat Feb 19, 2011 11:43 pm

According to the Fourth Branch, Arianrhod's uncle Math fab Mathonwy would die if he did not keep his feet in the lap of a virgin when he was not at war. Gilfaethwy conceives a lust for Math's original footholder, Goewin, and he and his brother Gwydion engineer a war with King Pryderi of Dyfed, forcing Math to leave his court. In his absence Gilfaethwy rapes Goewin, but is punished when Math returns (Math turns him and Gwydion into a series of mated pairs of animals). Math marries Goewin to alleviate her shame, but must find a new virgin to hold his feet.

Gwydion suggests his sister, Arianrhod. To test her virginity, Math tells her to step over his magician's rod. On doing this, however, she immediately gives birth to a young boy, Dylan Ail Don, and an entity which becomes Lleu Llaw Gyffes. Dylan is a sea spirit, who flees to the ocean immediately after he is baptized; Gwydion grabs the entity before anyone else sees it and places it in a chest. Before long it becomes a boy who grows at twice the normal rate; when he is four he is as big as an eight-year-old. Gwydion takes him to see his mother at her home, Caer Arianrhod.

His mom isHowever, Arianrhod is still angry about her humiliation at Math's court. She places a tynged (a geis or curse) on the boy that he will never have a name unless she gives it to him. Gwydion disguises the boy as a shoemaker and returns to Caer Arianrhod; while Arianrhod is being fitted, she sees the boy killing a wren with a single stone and remarks that the fair-haired one ("lleu") has a skillful hand ("llaw gyffes"). Gwydion reveals the disguise, and says she has just given her son a name – Lleu Llaw Gyffes. Arianrhod then places a second tynged on Lleu, that he would never take arms unless she armed him. A few years later Gwydion and Lleu return to Caer Arianrhod, this time disguised as bards. Gwydion is an accomplished storyteller and entertains her court. That night, while everyone sleeps, he conjures a fleet of warships. Arianrhod gives them weapons and armor to help her fight, thereby dispelling her second curse. When Gwydion reveals the trickery, Arianrhod places a final tynged on Lleu: he would never have a wife from any race that is on this earth nao. Gwydion and Math eventually break this curse by creating a woman out of oak blossom, broom, and meadowsweet; she is named Blodeuwedd ("flower face"). With her curses, Arianrhod denied Lleu the three aspects of masculinity: a name, arms, and a wife

This would make Natsuki Dylan and Saeko Arianhod

Miyotakano
HiME Ranger
HiME Ranger

Posts: 120
Bubuzuke points: 178
Armitage GUTS!!!: 36
Join date: 2011-02-03
Age: 16
Location: garderobe

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Mai-HiME/Otome In Mythology/Literature/Urban Legends

Post by Miyotakano on Sat Feb 19, 2011 11:44 pm

Translated gakutenou becomes a Fumi that surpasses even the heavens


Last edited by Miyotakano on Sat Feb 19, 2011 11:47 pm; edited 1 time in total

Miyotakano
HiME Ranger
HiME Ranger

Posts: 120
Bubuzuke points: 178
Armitage GUTS!!!: 36
Join date: 2011-02-03
Age: 16
Location: garderobe

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Mai-HiME/Otome In Mythology/Literature/Urban Legends

Post by Miyotakano on Sat Feb 19, 2011 11:47 pm

Since Akane uses a tonfa it draws attention to the malaysian culture, the word Harimau(Note the first part Hari or Harry)translates to tiger

Miyotakano
HiME Ranger
HiME Ranger

Posts: 120
Bubuzuke points: 178
Armitage GUTS!!!: 36
Join date: 2011-02-03
Age: 16
Location: garderobe

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Mai-HiME/Otome In Mythology/Literature/Urban Legends

Post by Miyotakano on Sat Feb 19, 2011 11:51 pm

Veles (Cyrillic: Велес; Polish: Weles;Czech: Veles; Old Russian and Old Church Slavonic: Велесъ) also known as Volos (Russian: Волосъ)? (listed as a Christian saint in Old Russian texts) is a major Slavic supernatural force of earth, waters and the underworld, associated with dragons, cattle, magic, musicians, wealth and trickery. He is the opponent of the Supreme thunder-Fumi Perun, and the battle between two of them constitutes one of the most important myths of Slavic mythology. No direct accounts survive, but reconstructions speculate that he may directly continue aspects of the Proto-Indo-European pantheon and that he may have been imagined as (at least partially) serpentine, with horns (of a bull, ram or some other domesticated herbivore), and a long beard. By all accounts, he was considered as an evil Fumi with gray shades.[citation needed]

Sources
Veles is one of few Slavic gods for which evidence of offerings can be found in all Slavic nations. The Primary Chronicle, a historical record of the early Eastern Slavic state, is the earliest and most important record, mentioning a Fumi named Volos several times. Here, Volos is mentioned as Fumi of cattle and peasants, who will punish oath-breakers with diseases, the opposite of Perun who is a described as a ruling Fumi of war who punishes by death in battle. In the later half of 10th century, Veles or Volos was one of seven gods whose statues Vladimir I, Prince of Kiev had erected in his city. It is very interesting that Veles' statue apparently wasn't standing next to others, on the hill where the prince's castle was, but lower in the city, on the marketplace. Not only does this indicate that Veles was connected with commerce, but it also shows that worship of Perun and Veles had to be kept separate: while it was proper for Perun's shrines to be built high, on the top of the hill, Veles' place was down, in the lowlands.

A similar pattern can be observed amongst the South Slavs. Here the name of Veles appears only in toponyms, the most well-known of which is the city of Veles in Macedonia, over which looms a hill of St. Elias the Thunderer. Another example is the town of Volosko in Croatia, situated on the seashore under the peak of Mount Ucka, nicknamed Perun. Amongst Western Slavs, the name can be principally found in 15th and 16th century Czech records, where it means either dragon or devil.

[edit] Etymology
It is probably same as Vala the enemy of Vedic thunder-Fumi Indra, and to Vels or Velinas, a devil of Baltic mythology and enemy of Baltic thunder-Fumi Perkūnas, as well as Nordic Vǫlsi "priapus". One possibility is that the name derives from the Proto-Indo-European root *wel-, meaning wool [1] (if so, the English word "wool" would actually be fairly closely related to the name of this Fumi). "Volos" is also the Russian word for "hair." This seems logical since Veles was believed to be deity of a horned cattle.

The name may also be related to Slavic terminology for oxen, for which the South Slavs and Russians all use "вол/vol."

[edit] Enemy of Perun and storm myth
The Russian philologists Vyacheslav Vsevolodovich Ivanov and Vladimir Toporov reconstructed the mythical battle of Perun and Veles through comparative study of various Indo-European mythologies and a large number of Slavic folk stories and songs. A unifying characteristic of all Indo-European mythologies is a story about a battle between a Fumi of thunder and a huge serpent or a dragon. In the Slavic version of the myth, Perun is a Fumi of thunder, whilst Veles acts as a dragon who opposes him, consistent with the Vala etymology; He is also similar to the Etruscan Underworld-monster Vetha and to the dragon Illuyankas, enemy of the storm Fumi of Hittite mythology.

The reason of enmity between the two gods is Veles' theft of Perun's son, wife or, usually, cattle. It is also an act of challenge: Veles, in the form of a huge serpent, slithers from the caves of the Underworld and coils upwards the Slavic world tree towards Perun's heavenly domain. Perun retaliates and attacks Veles with his lightning bolts. Veles flees, hiding or transforming himself into trees, animals or people. In the end he is killed by Perun, and in this ritual death, whatever Veles stole is released from his battered body in form of rain falling from the skies. This Storm myth, as it is generally referred to by scholars today, explained to ancient Slavs the changing of seasons through the year. The dry periods were interpreted as chaotic results of Veles' thievery. Storms and lightning were seen as divine battles. The following rain was the triumph of Perun over Veles and re-establishment of world order.

The myth was cyclical, repeating itself each year. The death of Veles was never permanent; he would reform himself as a serpent who would shed its old skin and would be reborn in a new body. Although in this particular myth he plays the negative role as bringer of chaos, Veles was not seen as an evil Fumi by ancient Slavs. In fact, in many of the Russian folk tales, Veles, appearing under the Christian guise of St. Nicholas, saves the poor farmer and his cattle from the furious and destructive St. Elias the Thunderer, who, of course, represents the old Perun. The duality and conflict of Perun and Veles does not represent the dualistic clash of good and evil; rather, it is the opposition of the natural principles of earth, water and substance (Veles) against heaven, fire and spirit (Perun).

[edit] Fumi of the underworld and death
Ancient Slavs viewed their world as a huge tree, with the treetop and branches representing the heavenly abode of gods and the world of mortals, whilst the roots represented the underworld. And while Perun, seen as a hawk or eagle sitting on a tallest branch of tree, was believed to be ruler of heaven and living world, Veles, seen as a huge serpent coiling around the roots, was ruling the world of dead. This was actually quite a lovely place, described in folk tales as a green and wet world of grassy plains and eternal spring, where various fantastic creatures dwell and the spirits of deceased watch over Veles' herds of cattle. In more geographical terms, the world of Veles was located, the Slavs believed, "across the sea", and it was there the migrating birds would fly to every winter. In folk tales this land is called Virey or Iriy. Each year, the Fumi of fertility and vegetation, Jarilo, who also dwelt there during winter, would return from across the sea and bring spring into the world of the living.

Veles also regularly sent spirits of the dead into the living world as his heralds. Festivals in honour of him were held near the end of the year, in winter, when time was coming to the very end of world order, chaos was growing stronger, the borders between worlds of living and dead were fading, and ancestral spirits would return amongst the living. This was the ancient pagan celebration of Velja noc (Great Night), the relic of which still persists amongst many Slavic countries in folk customs of Koleda, a kind of combination of carnival and Halloween, which can happen anywhere from Christmas up to end of February. Young men, known as koledari or vucari would dress long coats of sheep's wool and don grotesque masks, roaming around villages in groups and raising a lot of noise. They sang songs saying they travelled a long way, and they are all wet and muddy, an allusion of the wet underworld of Veles from which they came as ghosts of dead. The master of any house they visited would welcome them warmly and presented them with gifts. This is an example of Slavic shamanism, which also indicates Veles was a Fumi of magic and wealth. The gifts given to koledari were probably believed to be passed onto him (which makes him very much like a dragon hoarding treasure), thus ensuring good fortune and wealth for the house and family through entire year. As seen in descriptions from the Primary Chronicle, by angering Veles one would be stricken by diseases.

[edit] Fumi of magic and musicians
Veles' nature for mischief is evident both from his role in Storm myth and in carnival customs of Koledari shamans. In his role as a trickster Fumi, he is in some ways similar to both Greek Hermes and Scandinavian Loki, and like them, he was connected with magic. The word volhov, obviously derived from his name, in some Slavic languages still means sorcerer, whilst in the 12th century Russian epic The Tale of Igor's Campaign, character of Boyan the wizard is called Veles' grandson. Since magic was and is closely linked to music in primitive societies, Veles was also believed to be protector of travelling musicians. For instance, in some wedding ceremonies of northern Croatia (which continued up to 20th century), the music would not start playing unless the bridegroom, when making a toast, spilled some of the wine on the ground, preferably over the roots of the nearest tree. The symbolism of this is clear, even though forgotten long ago by those still performing it: the musicians will not sing until a toast is made to their patron deity [1].

[edit] Fumi of cattle and wealth
Veles' main practical function was protecting the cattle of Slavic tribes. Often he was referred to as skotji bog, meaning "cattle-Fumi". One of his attributes, as mentioned, were horns of bull or a ram, and probably also sheep's wool. As stated already, Veles was a Fumi of magic, and in some folk accounts, the expression presti vunu (weaving wool) or, particularly, crnu vunu presti (weaving of black wool) stands as allusion to magical crafts. In some of surviving Koledo songs, Koledari sing they are coming along and "weaving black wool".

Thus, being a "wooly" Fumi, Veles was considered to be a protector of shepherds, which reveals one additional trait of his enemity with Perun, who, as a giver of rain, would be Fumi of farmers. Veles, however, did have some influence over agriculture, or at least harvest. Among many Slavic nations, most notably in Russia, a harvest custom persisted of cutting the first ear of wheat and tying it in a sort of amulet which protected the harvest from evil spirits. This was called 'tying of the beard of Veles', which also indicates Veles was imagined to be bearded. In several South Slavic languages, witty expressions such as puna šaka brade (full fist of beard) or, particularly, primiti boga za bradu ("to grab a Fumi for [his] beard", the forgotten Fumi in this expression most likely being a pagan Veles), allude to exceptionally good fortune and gaining of wealth.

[edit] Post-Christian Veles
After the advent of Christianity, Veles was split into several different characters. As a Fumi of the Underworld and dragons he, of course, became identified with the Devil. His more benevolent sides were transformed to several Christian saints. As a protector of cattle, he became associated with Saint Blaise, popularly known among various Slavic nations as St. Vlaho, St. Blaz, or St. Vlasiy. In Yaroslavl, for example, the first church built on the site of Veles's pagan shrine was dedicated to St Blaise, for the latter's name was similar to Veles and he was likewise considered a heavenly patron of shepherds [2]. As mentioned already, in many Eastern Slavic folk tales, he was replaced by St. Nicholas, probably because the popular stories of the saint describe him as a giver of wealth and a sort of a trickster.

It is remarkable that Veles managed to hold so many versatile attributes in ancient Slavic mythology and was not split into more characters until the arrival of Christianity; by contrast, his opponent Perun was never venerated as nothing more and nothing less than a Fumi of thunder and storm, a very narrow sphere of influence compared to Veles' versatility. In other Indo-European mythologies, similar gods were schematically divided into several different deities. For instance, in Greek mythology, at least four different characters show similarities to Veles: Pan (music and cattle), Hermes (magic and trickery), Hades (death and the underworld) and Typhon (serpentine enemy of the Greek thunder Fumi, Zeus). Only in Celtic mythology do we find a deity similar to Veles in his attributes and his complexity: Cernunnos, Fumi of druids, nature, horned animals and shamanism, whose symbol was a ram-headed serpent.


Miyotakano
HiME Ranger
HiME Ranger

Posts: 120
Bubuzuke points: 178
Armitage GUTS!!!: 36
Join date: 2011-02-03
Age: 16
Location: garderobe

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Mai-HiME/Otome In Mythology/Literature/Urban Legends

Post by Miyotakano on Sat Feb 19, 2011 11:52 pm

Artemis was one of the most widely venerated of the Ancient Greek deities. Some scholars[1] believe that the name, and indeed the goddess herself, was originally pre-Greek.[2] Homer refers to her as Artemis Agrotera, Potnia Theron "Artemis of the wildland, Mistress of Animals".[3] In the classical period of Greek mythology, Artemis (Greek: (nominative) Ἄρτεμις, (genitive) Ἀρτέμιδος) was often described as the daughter of Zeus and Leto, and the twin sister of Apollo. She was the Hellenic goddess of the hunt, wild animals, wilderness, childbirth, virginity and young girls, bringing and relieving disease in women; she often was depicted as a huntress carrying a bow and arrows.[4] The deer and the cypress were sacred to her. In later Hellenistic times, she even assumed the ancient role of Eileithyia in aiding childbirth.

Artemis later became identified with Selene,[5] a Titaness who was a Greek moon goddess, sometimes depicted with a crescent moon above her head. She was also identified with the Roman goddess Diana,[6] with the Etruscan goddess Artume, and with the Greek or Carian goddess Hecate.[7]

EtymologyA hypothesis connects Artemis to the Proto-Indo-European root *h₂ŕ̥tḱos meaning "bear" due to her cultic practices in Brauronia and the Neolithic remains at the Arkouditessa. Though connection with Anatolian names has been suggested[8] and confirmed, as from a "common-gender term for bear in Hittite",[9] the earliest attested form of the name Artemis is the Mycenaean Greek a-ti-mi-te, written in Linear B syllabic script at Pylos.[10] Artemis was venerated in Lydia as Artimus.[11]

In more traditional etymology within Ancient Greek, the name has been related to "ἀρτεμής" (artemes), "safe",[12] or "ἄρταμος" (artamos) "a butcher".[13][14]

Stories of birth and childhoodBirth
Apollo (left) and Artemis. Brygos (potter, signed), Briseis Painter, Tondo of an Attic red-figure cup, ca. 470 BC, Louvre.Various conflicting accounts are given in Classical Greek mythology of the birth of Artemis and her twin brother, Apollo. All accounts agree, however, that she was the daughter of Zeus and Leto and that she was the twin sister of Apollo.

An account by Callimachus has it that Hera forbade Leto to give birth on either terra firma (the mainland) or on an island. Hera was angry with Zeus, her husband, because he had impregnated Leto. But the island of Delos (or Ortygia in the Homeric Hymn to Artemis) disobeyed Hera, and Leto gave birth there.[15] In ancient Cretan history Leto was worshipped at Phaistos and in Cretan mythology Leto gave birth to Apollo and Artemis at the islands known today as the Paximadia.

A scholium of Servius on Aeneid iii. 72 accounts for the island's archaic name Ortygia[16] by asserting that Zeus transformed Leto into a quail (ortux) in order to prevent Hera from finding out his infidelity, and Kenneth McLeish suggested further that in quail form Leto would have given birth with as few birth-pains as a mother quail suffers when it lays an egg.[17]

The myths also differ as to whether Artemis was born first, or Apollo. Most stories depict Artemis as born first, becoming her mother's mid-wife upon the birth of her brother Apollo.

Childhood
Roman marble Bust of Artemis after Kephisodotos (Musei Capitolini), RomeThe childhood of Artemis is not fully related in any surviving myth. The Iliad reduced the figure of the dread goddess to that of a girl, who, having been thrashed by Hera, climbs weeping into the lap of Zeus.[18] A poem of Callimachus to the goddess "who amuses herself on mountains with archery" imagines some charming vignettes: according to Callimachus, at three years old, Artemis, while sitting on the knee of her father, Zeus, asked him to grant her six wishes: to remain always a virgin; to have many names to set her apart from her brother Apollo; to be the Phaesporia or Light Bringer; to have a bow and arrow and a knee-length tunic so that she could hunt; to have sixty "daughters of Okeanos", all nine years of age, to be her choir; and for twenty Amnisides Nymphs as handmaidens to watch her dogs and bow while she rested. She wished for no city dedicated to her, but to rule the mountains, and for the ability to help women in the pains of childbirth.[19]

Artemis believed that she had been chosen by the Fates to be a midwife, particularly since she had assisted her mother in the delivery of her twin brother, Apollo.[20] All of her companions remained virgins and Artemis guarded her own chastity closely. Her symbols included the golden bow and arrow, the hunting dog, the stag, and the moon. Callimachus tells[21] how Artemis spent her girlhood seeking out the things that she would need to be a huntress, how she obtained her bow and arrows from the isle of Lipara, where Hephaestus and the Cyclops worked. Okeanus' daughters were filled with fear, but the young Artemis bravely approached and asked for bow and arrows. Callimachus then tells how Artemis visited Pan, the Fumi of forest and he gave her seven bitches and six dogs. She then captured six golden-horned deer to pull her chariot. Artemis practiced with her bow first by shooting at trees and then at wild beasts.

Physical description
Statue of Diana/Artemis at the Vatican MuseumsArtemis was portrayed in Classical sculpture as a young woman, tall and slim. As a goddess of hunting, Artemis wore a girlish knee-length tunic, and carried bow and quiver on her shoulder. Sometimes, a stag was represented with her or a hunting dog. When portrayed as a goddess of the moon, Artemis wore a long robe and sometimes a veil covered her head.

AttributesBow and arrow
According to the Homeric Hymn to Artemis, she had golden bow and arrows, as her epithet was Khryselakatos, "of the Golden Shaft", and Iokheira (Showered by Arrows). The arrows of Artemis could also to bring sudden death and disease to girls and women. Artemis got her bow and arrow for the first time from The Kyklopes, as the one she asked from her father. The bow of Artemis also became the witness of Callisto's oath of her virginity. In later cult, the bow became the symbol of waxing moon.[22]

Chariots
Artemis' chariot was made of gold and was pulled by four golden horned deer (Elaphoi Khrysokeroi). The bridles of her chariot were also made of gold.[23]

Spears, Nets, and Lyre
Although quite seldom, Artemis is sometimes portrayed with a hunting spear. Her cult in Aetolia, the Artemis Aetolian, showed her with a hunting spear. The description about Artemis' spear can be found in Ovid's Metamorphosis[where?], while Artemis with a fishing connected with her cult as a patron goddess of fishing.[24]

As a goddess of maiden dances and songs, Artemis is often portrayed with a lyre.[25]

FaunaDeer
Deer were the only animals held sacred to Artemis herself. On seeing a deer larger than a bull with horns shining, she fell in love with these creatures and held them sacred. Deer were also the first animals she captured. She caught five golden horned deer called Elaphoi Khrysokeroi and harnessed them to her chariot.[26] To catch the Cerynitian Hind alive was the third labour of Heracles commanded by Eurystheus. Heracles begged Artemis for forgiveness and promised to return it alive. Artemis forgave him but targeted Eurystheus for her wrath.[27]

Hunting Dog
Artemis got her hunting dogs from Pan in the forest of Arcadia. Pan gave Artemis two black-and-white dogs, three reddish ones, and one spotted one - these dogs were able to hunt even lions. Pan also gave Atemis seven bitches of the finest Arcadian race. However, Artemis only ever brought seven dogs hunting with her at any one time.[28]

Boar
The boar is one of the favorite animals of the hunters, and also hard to tame. In honor of Artemis' skill, they sacrificed it to her. Oineus and Adonis were both killed by Artemis' boar.[29]

Bear
The sacrifice of a bear for Artemis started from the Brauron cult. Every year, a little girl age not more than ten and less than five sent to Artemis' temple at Brauron. Arktos e Brauroniois, a text by Byzantine writer, Suidas, told a legend about a bear that was tamed by Artemis, and introduced to people of Athens. They touched it and played with it, until one day a group of young girls poked the bear. It was furious, and attacked the girls. One of the girls' brother found out what had happened and killed the bear; Artemis sent a plague in revenge. The Athenians consulted an oracle of how to end the plague. The oracle suggested that,in payment for the bear's blood, every young Athenian virgin should not be allowed to marry until she had served Artemis in her temple ('played the bear for the goddess').[30]

Guinea Fowl
Artemis felt pity for the Meleagrids as they mourned for their lost brother, Meleagor, so she transformed them into Guinea Fowl; to be her favorite animals[citation needed].

Buzzard Hawk
Hawks were a favored bird of many of the gods, Artemis included[citation needed].

FloraPalm and Cypress were issued[clarification needed] to be her birth place. Another plants sacred for Artemis are Amaranth and Asphodel[31]

Artemis in mythologyArtemis and ActaeonArtemis was once bathing in a vale on Mount Cithaeron, when the Theban hunter Actaeon stumbled across her. Enraged, Artemis turned him into a stag and, not knowing their own owner, Actaeon's own dogs killed him.

Artemis and Adonis
The Death of Adonis, by Giuseppe Mazzuoli, 1709 - Hermitage MuseumIn some versions of the story of Adonis, who was a late addition to Greek mythology during the Hellenistic period, Artemis sent a wild boar to kill Adonis as punishment for his hubristic boast that he was a better hunter than she.

In other versions, Artemis killed Adonis for revenge. In later myths, Adonis had been related as a favorite of Aphrodite, and Aphrodite was responsible for the death of Hippolytus, who had been a favorite of Artemis. Therefore, Artemis killed Adonis to avenge Hippolytus’s death.

In yet another version, Adonis was not killed by Artemis, but by Ares, as punishment for being with Aphrodite.

OrionOrion was a hunting companion of the goddess Artemis. In some versions of his story he was killed by Artemis, while in others he was killed by a scorpion sent by Gaia. In some versions, Orion tried to seduce Opis,[32] one of her followers, and she killed him. In a version by Aratus,[33] Orion took hold of Artemis' robe and she killed him in self-defense.

In yet another version, Apollo sent the scorpion. According to Hyginus[34] Artemis once loved Orion (in spite of the late source, this version appears to be a rare remnant of her as the pre-Olympian goddess, who took consorts, as Eos did), but was tricked into killing him by her brother Apollo, who was "protective" of his sister's maidenhood.

The AloadaeThese twin sons of Iphidemia and Poseidon, Otos and Ephialtes, grew enormously at a young age. They were aggressive, great hunters, and could not be killed unless they killed each other. The growth of the Aloadae never stopped, and they boasted that as soon as they could reach heaven, they would kidnap Artemis and Hera and take them as wives. The gods were afraid of them, except for Artemis who captured a fine deer (or in another version of the story, she changed herself into a doe) and jumped out between them. The Aloadae threw their spears and so mistakenly killed each other.

Wooing the GoddessAs a young virgin, Artemis had interested many gods and men, but none of them successfully won her heart, except her hunting companion Orion, who was then accidentally killed either by the goddess herself or by Gaia.

Alpheus, a river Fumi, was in love with Artemis, but he realized that nothing he could do would win her heart. So he decided to capture her. Artemis who was with her companions at Letrenoi, went to Alpheus, but suspicious of his motives, she covered her face with mud so the river Fumi would not recognize her. Another story involving the Fumi is the story where he tried to rape Artemis' attendant Arethusa. The goddess felt pity for her and saved her by transforming Arethusa into a spring in Artemis' temple, Artemis Alphaea in Letrini, where the goddess and her attendant drink.

Bouphagos, the son of the Titan Iapetos, saw Artemis and had a thought of raping her. Detecting his sinful thoughts Artemis struck him at Mount Pholoe.

Sipriotes was a boy who, either because he accidentally saw Artemis bathing or attempted to rape her, was turned into a girl by the goddess.

Callisto
Diana and Callisto by TitianCallisto was the daughter of Lycaon, King of Arcadia and also was one of Artemis's hunting attendants. As a companion of Artemis, she took a vow of chastity. Zeus appeared to her disguised as Artemis, or in some stories Apollo, gained her confidence, then took advantage of her (or raped her, according to Ovid). As a result of this encounter she conceived a son, Arcas. Enraged, Hera or Artemis (some accounts say both) changed her into a bear. Arcas almost killed the bear, but Zeus stopped him just in time. Out of pity, Zeus placed Callisto the bear into the heavens, thus the origin of Callisto the Bear as a constellation. Some stories say that he placed both Arcas and Callisto into the heavens as bears, forming the Ursa Minor and Ursa Major constellations.

Iphigenia and the Taurian ArtemisArtemis punished Agamemnon after he killed a sacred stag in a sacred grove and boasted that he was a better hunter than the goddess. When the Greek fleet was preparing at Aulis to depart for Troy to begin the Trojan War, Artemis becalmed the winds. The seer Calchas advised Agamemnon that the only way to appease Artemis was to sacrifice his daughter Iphigenia. Artemis then snatched Iphigenia from the altar and substituted a deer. Various myths have been told around what happened after Artemis took her. Either she was brought to Tauros and led the priests there, or became Artemis' immortal companion [35]

NiobeA Queen of Thebes and wife of Amphion, Niobe boasted of her superiority to Leto because while she had fourteen children (Niobids), seven boys and seven girls, Leto had only one of each. When Artemis and Apollo heard this impiety, Apollo killed her sons as they practiced athletics, and Artemis shot her daughters, who died instantly without a sound. Apollo and Artemis used poisoned arrows to kill them, though according to some versions two of the Niobids were spared, one boy and one girl. Amphion, at the sight of his dead sons, killed himself. A devastated Niobe and her remaining children were turned to stone by Artemis as they wept. The gods themselves entombed them.

The MeleagridsAfter the death of Meleager, Artemis turned his grieving sisters, the Meleagrids into guineafowl that Artemis loved very much.

ChioneChione was a princess of Pokis. She was beloved by two gods, Hermes and Apollo, and boasted that she was prettier than Artemis because she made two gods fall in love with her at once. Artemis was furious and killed Chione with her arrow or struck her dumb by shooting off her tongue. However, some versions of this myth say Apollo and Hermes protected her from Artemis' wrath.

Atalanta and OeneusArtemis saved the infant Atalanta from dying of exposure after her father abandoned her. She sent a female bear to suckle the baby, who was then raised by hunters. But she later sent a bear to hurt Atalanta because people said Atalanta was a better hunter. This is in some stories.

Among other adventures, Atalanta participated in the hunt for the Calydonian Boar, which Artemis had sent to destroy Calydon because King Oeneus had forgotten her at the harvest sacrifices. In the hunt, Atalanta drew the first blood, and was awarded the prize of the skin. She hung it in a sacred grove at Tegea as a dedication to Artemis.

AuraIn Nonnus' Dionysiaca,[36] Aura was Greek goddess of breezes and cool air, daughter of Lelantos and Periboia. She was a virgin huntress, just like Artemis, and proud of her maidenhood. One day, she claimed that Artemis' body was too womanly and she doubted her virginity. Artemis asked for Nemesis' help to avenge her dignity and caused the rape of Aura by Dionysus. Aura became a mad and dangerous killer. When she bore twin sons, she ate one of them while the other one, Iakhos, was saved by Artemis. Iakhos later became an attendant of Demeter and the leader of Eleusinian Mysteries.

Trojan WarArtemis may have been represented as a supporter of Troy because her brother Apollo was the patron Fumi of the city and she herself was widely worshipped in western Anatolia in historical times. In the Iliad[37] she came to blows with Hera, when the divine allies of the Greeks and Trojans engaged each other in conflict. Hera struck Artemis on the ears with her own quiver, causing the arrows to fall out. As Artemis fled crying to Zeus, Leto gathered up the bow and arrows which had fallen out of the quiver.

Artemis played quite a large part in this war. Like her mother and brother, who was widely worshiped at Troy, Artemis took the side of the Trojans. At the Greek's journey to Troy, Artemis becalmed the sea and stopped the journey until an oracle came and said they could win the goddess' heart by sacrificing Iphigenia, Agamemnon's daughter. Agamemnon once promised the goddess he would sacrifice the dearest thing to him, which was Iphigenia, but broke the promise. Other sources[which?] said he boasted about his hunting ability and provoked the goddess' anger. Artemis saved Iphigenia because of her bravery. In some versions of the myth,[which?], Artemis made Iphigenia her attendant or turned her into Hecate, goddess of night, witchcraft, and the underworld.

Aeneas was helped by Artemis, Leto, and Apollo. Apollo found him wounded by Diomedes and lifted him to heaven. There, the three of them secretly healed him in a great chamber.

Worship of Artemis
Roman Temple of Artemis in Jerash, Jordan, built during the reign of Antoninus Pius.Main article: Brauronia
Artemis, the goddess of forests and hills, was worshipped throughout ancient Greece.[38] Her best known cults were on the island of Delos (her birthplace); in Attica at Brauron and Mounikhia (near Piraeus); in Sparta. She was often depicted in paintings and statues in a forest setting, carrying a bow and arrows, and accompanied by a deer.

As Aeginaea, she was worshiped in Sparta; the name means either huntress of chamois, or the wielder of the javelin (αιγανέα).[39][40] She was worshipped at Naupactus as Aetole; in her temple in that town there was a statue of white marble representing her throwing a javelin.[41] This "Aetolian Artemis" would not have been introduced at Naupactus, anciently a place of Ozolian Locris, until it was awarded to the Aetolians by Philip II of Macedon. Strabo records another precinct of "Aetolian Artemos" at the head of the Adriatic.[42] As Agoraea she was the protector of the agora. As Agrotera, she was especially associated as the patron goddess of hunters. In Elis she was worshiped as Alphaea. In Athens Artemis was often associated with the local Aeginian goddess, Aphaea. As Potnia Theron, she was the patron of wild animals; Homer used this title. As Kourotrophos, she was the nurse of yutes. As Locheia, she was the goddess of childbirth and midwives. She was sometimes known as Cynthia, from her birthplace on Mount Cynthus on Delos, or Amarynthia from a festival in her honor originally held at Amarynthus in Euboea. She was sometimes identified by the name Phoebe, the feminine form of her brother Apollo's solar epithet Phoebus.

The ancient Spartans used to sacrifice to her as one of their patron goddesses before starting a new military campaign.

Athenian festivals in honor of Artemis included Elaphebolia, Mounikhia, Kharisteria, and Brauronia. The festival of Artemis Orthia was observed in Sparta.


Sanctuary of Artemis at BrauronPre-pubescent Athenian girls and young Athenian girls approaching marriageable age were sent to the sanctuary of Artemis at Brauron to serve the Goddess for one year. During this time the girls were known as arktoi, or little she-bears. A myth explaining this servitude relates that a bear had formed the habit of regularly visiting the town of Brauron, and the people there fed it, so that over time the bear became tame. A young girl teased the bear, and, in some versions of the myth it killed her, while in other versions it clawed her eyes out. Either way, the girl's brothers killed the bear, and Artemis was enraged. She demanded that young girls "act the bear" at her sanctuary in atonement for the bear's death.

Virginal Artemis was worshipped as a fertility/childbirth goddess in some places, assimilating Ilithyia, since, according to some myths, she assisted her mother in the delivery of her twin. During the Classical period in Athens, she was identified with Hecate. Artemis also assimilated Caryatis (Carya).

FestivalsArtemis was born at the sixth day, the reason way it was sacred for her.

Festival of Artemis in Brauron, where girls aged not more than 10 and not less than 5 dressed in saffron robes played the bear to appease the goddess after the plagued she sent when her bear was killed.
Festival of Amarysia is a celebration to worship Artemis Amarysia in Attica. In 2007, a team of Swiss and Greek archaeologists found the ruin of Artemis Amarysia Temple, at Euboea, Greece.[43]
Festival of Artemis Saronia, a festival to celebrate Artemis in Trozeinos, a town in Argolis. A king named Saron built a sanctuary for the goddess after the goddess saved his life when he went on hunting and swept by the wave and held a festival for her.[44]
At the 16 of Metageitnio (Second month on Athenian calendar), people sacrifice to Artemis and Hecate at deme of Erchia.[45]
Kharisteria Festival on 6 of Boidromion (third month) to celebrate the victory of Marathon and also known as the Athenian 'Thanksgiving'.[46]
Day six of Elaphobolia (ninth month) festival of Artemis the Deer Huntress where she was offered cakes shaped like stags, made from dough, honey and sesame-seeds.[47]
Day 6 of 16 of Mounikhion (tenth month) a celebration of her as the goddess of nature and animal. A Goat was being sacrificed to her.[48]
Day 6 of Thargelion (eleventh month) the 'birthday' of the goddess, while the seventh was Apollo's.[49]
A festival for Artemis Diktynna (of the net) in Hypsous.
Laphria, a festival for Artems in Patrai. The procession started by setting the logs of wood a rounf the altar each of them sixteen cubits long. On the altar within the circle is placed the driest of their wood. Just before the time of the festival they construct a smooth ascent to the altar, piling earth upon the altar steps.The festival begins with a most splendid procession in honor of Artemis, and the maiden officiating as priestess rides last in the procession upon a car yoked to deer. It is, however, not till the next day that the sacrifice is offered.
In Orchomenus, a sanctuary was built for Artemis Hymnia where her festival celebrated there every year.
Artemis in art
Fourth century Praxitelean bronze head of a goddess wearing a lunate crown, found at Issa (Vis, Croatia)The oldest representations of Artemis in Greek Archaic art portray her as Potnia Theron ("Queen of the Beasts"): a winged goddess holding a stag and leopard in her hands, or sometimes a leopard and a lion. This winged Artemis lingered in ex-votos as Artemis Orthia, with a sanctuary close by Sparta.

In Greek classical art she is usually portrayed as a maiden huntress clothed in a girl's short skirt,[50] with hunting boots, a quiver, a bow[51] and arrows. Often she is shown in the shooting pose, and is accompanied by a hunting dog or stag. Her darker side is revealed in some vase paintings, where she is shown as the death-bringing goddess whose arrows fell young maidens and women, such as the daughters of Niobe.

The attributes of the goddess were often varied: bow and arrows were sometimes replaced by hunting spears; as a goddess of maiden dances she occasionally held a lyre;[52] as a goddess of light, a pair of flaming torches.

Only in post-Classical art do we find representations of Artemis-Diana with the crown of the crescent moon, as Luna. In the ancient world, although she was occasionally associated with the moon, she was never portrayed as the moon itself. Ancient statues of Artemis have been found with crescent moons, but these moons are always Renaissance-era additions.

On June 7, 2007, a Roman era bronze sculpture of “Artemis and the Stag” was sold at Sotheby’s auction house in New York state by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery for $25.5 million.


Remains of the temple today.Artemis as the Lady of EphesusMain article: Temple of Artemis

The Artemis of Ephesus, 1st century AD (Ephesus Archaeological Museum)At Ephesus in Ionia (Turkey), her temple became one of the Seven Wonders of the World. It was probably the best known center of her worship except for Delos. There the Lady whom the Ionians associated with Artemis through interpretatio Graeca was worshiped primarily as a mother goddess, akin to the Phrygian goddess Cybele, in an ancient sanctuary where her cult image depicted the "Lady of Ephesus" adorned with multiple rounded breast like protuberances on her chest. They had been traditionally interpreted as multiple accessory breasts, or as sacrificed bull testes, as some newer scholars claimed,[53] until excavation at the site of the Artemision in 1987-88 identified the multitude of tear-shaped amber beads that had adorned her ancient wooden xoanon. In Acts of the Apostles, Ephesian metalsmiths who felt threatened by Saint Paul's preaching of Christianity, jealously rioted in her defense, shouting “Great is Artemis of the Ephesians!”[54] Only one of 121 columns still stand in Ephesus. The rest were used for making churches, roads, and forts.

Artemis in astronomyA minor planet, (105) Artemis; a lunar crater; the Artemis Chasma and the Artemis Corona (both on Venus) have all been named for her.

As Selene she is associated with the Moon, and as Phoebe her name was borrowed for a moon of Saturn

Miyotakano
HiME Ranger
HiME Ranger

Posts: 120
Bubuzuke points: 178
Armitage GUTS!!!: 36
Join date: 2011-02-03
Age: 16
Location: garderobe

View user profile

Back to top Go down

My-Hime and mythology

Post by Magus Phantalus on Sun Apr 08, 2012 12:01 am

Now I know tvtropes can be very critical of My-Hime and Shizuru in particular but I read an interesting little bit there and now my obssession with mythology is piqued. This little bit offers an interesting parrallel between Shizuru and japanese draconic mythology. I'm doing a little reasearch on it and it seems legit. Thoughts? Other interesting mythological parralles you noticed?

" According to Japanese mythology, Japanese nobles are descended from dragons, who instinctively know their soulmates. Once they have met and been accepted by their chosen mate, their physical and mental health depends on the continued presence of their mate. Fujino Shizuru is probably of noble blood, if her skill in the traditional arts is anything to go by. Met Natsuki, had issues remembering that other people mattered, but was kept relatively stable by Natsuki's presence. Note that she didn't snap until she was blatantly rejected by Natsuki, and was brought back to sanity by same's acceptance. Diagnosis: Her Inner Dragon was bashing its head against the wall."

Magus Phantalus
Valkyrie
Valkyrie

Posts: 365
Bubuzuke points: 548
Armitage GUTS!!!: 147
Join date: 2011-11-08
Location: The Endless Dream

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Mai-HiME/Otome In Mythology/Literature/Urban Legends

Post by Highman on Mon Apr 09, 2012 3:43 pm

Magus Phantalus wrote:Now I know tvtropes can be very critical of My-Hime and Shizuru in particular but I read an interesting little bit there and now my obssession with mythology is piqued. This little bit offers an interesting parrallel between Shizuru and japanese draconic mythology. I'm doing a little reasearch on it and it seems legit. Thoughts? Other interesting mythological parralles you noticed?

" According to Japanese mythology, Japanese nobles are descended from dragons, who instinctively know their soulmates. Once they have met and been accepted by their chosen mate, their physical and mental health depends on the continued presence of their mate. Fujino Shizuru is probably of noble blood, if her skill in the traditional arts is anything to go by. Met Natsuki, had issues remembering that other people mattered, but was kept relatively stable by Natsuki's presence. Note that she didn't snap until she was blatantly rejected by Natsuki, and was brought back to sanity by same's acceptance. Diagnosis: Her Inner Dragon was bashing its head against the wall."

Could Mai as well descendant as a Japanese nobles probably to other potentials nobility like Mikoto and Fumi.

Highman
Valkyrie
Valkyrie

Posts: 433
Bubuzuke points: 578
Armitage GUTS!!!: 111
Join date: 2010-09-12

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Mai-HiME/Otome In Mythology/Literature/Urban Legends

Post by Magus Phantalus on Mon Apr 09, 2012 9:18 pm

I suppose one could argue any of the Hime might be descendants from royalty since you know hime translates to princess... I think.

Magus Phantalus
Valkyrie
Valkyrie

Posts: 365
Bubuzuke points: 548
Armitage GUTS!!!: 147
Join date: 2011-11-08
Location: The Endless Dream

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Mai-HiME/Otome In Mythology/Literature/Urban Legends

Post by Luu Sky Sapphire on Thu Feb 07, 2013 7:33 pm

Nymph was able to secure these informational images on each HiME and their respective CHILD. Even Reito, Miyu, Alyssa and her CHILD, Artemis. I'll be sharing them with you in two split posts guys. Discuss!



日暮あかね
Higurashi Akane
DOB: 9/7
Constellation: Virgo
Blood Type: A
Height: 156cm Weight: 44kg
B/W/H: 82/52/83
CHILD: Hari

Seeing how Akane uses a tonfa, it brings attention to the Asian culture. Rather than a lady fumi, Hari's origin can be found in a non-fictional source in Malaysia. Tani Yutaka's little sister was killed in England, but the murderer was judged to be innocent. For revenge, this Japanese man began stealing valuable belongings in England and giving them away to people in Malaysia where he lived, making him legendary there. His acts of kindness, from the Malaysian point of view, led to the creation of Harimau Beneficial Bandits. The character that symbolizes the group is Harimau, the word for Tiger in Malaysian.



菊川 雪之
Kikukawa Yukino
DOB: 3/8
Constellation: Pisces
Blood Type: AB
Height: 154cm Weight: 41kg
B/W/H/: 79/54/79
CHILD: Diana

As reported in the official guidebook, Diana is a reference to Anne of Green Gables. Anne's best friend Diana notices how Anne is growing a mysterious plant in the forest. If Diana is a reference to this, it means Haruka represents Anne, while Diana is Yukino.



真田 紫子
Sanada Yukariko
DOB: 1/1
Constellation: Capricorn
Blood Type: A
Height: 159cm Weight: 44kg
B/W/H: 89/58/86
CHILD: Vlas

Yukariko, being a nun, has a partial reference to Christianity. Back when Christianity was the target of persecution, the cross used to be the target of arrows, and whoever was able to stick three on it was said to be able to become a master of archery. Whether this is the origin or not, three signifies demons, such as the trident that devils are usually drawn with. Later on, the word "hamartia", meaning "sin", was made due to pressure from Greece, but it literally translates as "off target". As for Yukariko's CHILD, it's origin can be seen in a lady fumi originally named Volos. When Volos' idol was thrown into the Pocayna River, he either became the Devil, or alternatively he became St. Vlas, a Shepard. He is often tied together with the image of sexual suppression and male sexual organs.



深優・グリーア
Miyu Glear
DOB: 7/4
Constellation: Cancer
Height: 156cm Weight 45kg
B/W/H: 81/54/79

アリッサ・シアーズ
Alyssa Searrs
DOB: 4/1
Constellation: Aries
Blood Type: AB
Height: 122cm Weight: 22kg
B/W/H: 54/49/56
CHILD: Artemis

A reference to Artemis, Goddess of Mountains, sometimes the Moon, and hunting from Greek Mythology. A master of archery, this explains the accuracy when firing the Golden Lightning.

As we know, M.I.Y.U. stands for Multiple Intelligencial Yggdrasil Unit. Clay is what is used to mend Yggdrasil, and one could allude that in this respect it is similar to the artificial Norse lady fumi Mokkurkalfi, that was created from clay during a battle between Thor and Hrungnir.



鴇羽 舞衣
Tokiha Mai
DOB: 7/22
Constellation: Cancer
Blood Type: O
Height: 157cm Weight: 46kg
B/W/H: 87/56/83
CHILD: Kagutsuchi

Kagutsuchi is based on Honokaguchi, a lady fumi of fire in Japanese mythology. It is the son of two Gods, Izanami no Mikoto and Izanagi no Mikoto, who are creators of the islands of Japan. As Honokaguchi was born, it burned his mother Izanami to death, becoming a motherless child like Mai. Whether this is the cause or not, Izanagi beheads Honokaguchi with the Totsuka Sword, a sword 10 grips long. The sword we see stuck in Kagutsuchi's head is a reference to this.




宗像 詩帆
Munakata Shiho
DOB: 10/16
Constellation: Libra
Blood Type: O
Height: 152cm Weight: 41kg
B/W/H: 78/53/80
CHILD: Yatagarasu

Yatagarasu dwells in the Sun, and is the messenger of the Sun Goddess, Amaterasu Oomikami. Karasu means "crow", so as easily guessed, this child is a crow. Crows are usually associated with negative images, but that's a western influence. In Japan, it was originally a messenger of the Gods characterized by loyalty, honesty, and devotion. However, Yatagarasu is usually depicted with three legs. Since Shiho's CHILD had only one leg, loyalty, truthfulness and devotion must have been replaced with solitude, jealousy, and monopoly.



姫野 二三
Himeno Fumi
DOB: 2/3
Constellation: Aquarius
Blood Type: AB
Height: 161cm Weight: 47kg
B/W/H: 88/56/82
CHILD: Suishouhime

風花 真白
Kazahana Mashiro
DOB: 2/3
Constellation Aquarius
Blood Type: AB
Height: 138cm Weight: 31kg
B/W/H: 64/50/65

Seeing how she wields a death-scythe, the best image for Fumi would be Hades, lady fumi of the Underworld. A word about her name probably comes from hifumi norito, a prayer that leads the spirit to heavenly peace. But since a character is missing, it's probably going to stop at rest, not making it's way to peace. This explains how Mashiro, who is over 300 years old, kept her soul in the present world.

Mashiro, as Reito called her the Queen of Hell, would be put in the position of Izanami, who carries the nature of death in her character.

_________________
Mai-X-Project




The law of physics: Whenever there's this much gay in one room, Shizuru manifests!
When Shizuru said "Ara" for the first time, the "Ara" broke into a thousand pieces and they all went skipping about. That was the beginning of fairies.
"In the words of George Takei, "Ara~!"

Luu Sky Sapphire
Administrator. The Showstopper. The Headliner. The Main Event. The Icon. Mr. Mai-Series.
Administrator. The Showstopper. The Headliner. The Main Event. The Icon. Mr. Mai-Series.

Posts: 36033
Bubuzuke points: 39513
Armitage GUTS!!!: 2349
Join date: 2010-05-01
Age: 28
Location: Garderobe Academy

View user profile http://shiznat.webs.com/

Back to top Go down

Page 1 of 2 1, 2  Next

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum